Google Honours Requests To Take Down “Revenge Porn” Images

Chrissy Chambers - Revenge Porn Victim

Chrissy Chambers – Revenge Porn Victim

In an announcement yesterday, Google has outlined their policy on requests to take down revenge porn images.

While it is Google’s general policy to index, and make searchable, the entire internet. It seems that they have taken a different approach here, mostly due to the sensitive nature of the content – “nude or sexually explicit images” – and that the subject has not given their permission for it to be published.

While Google obviously can’t take the content down from the website hosting it, Google can and will honour requests to remove such content from it’s searchable index.

The concept of revenge porn has existed for some time now, but it’s only recently that there seems to be a growing concern. There are few laws that cover revenge porn specifically, and other applicable laws are generally too vague to seek a prosecution.

In the UK a law has been passed which specifically states that ‘it is an offence to share intimate photos or videos of a former partner without their consent’. Conviction of this crime could have the perpetrator face up to two years in prison. Similar laws are now being passed in US states such as California, Texas and Utah.